Dual Process Term

Dual Process Theory. Logic and Similarity processing info at same time in different manners for different goals. Logic using words for planning; Similarity for immediate action using patterns

A Dual Process Theory is the term for theories that provide two explanations for how a phenomenon occurs. In Mental Construction the phenomenon is reasoning. The two explanations it offers are reasoning by logical and by similarity. In discussions of brain processing, an additional aspect of the Dual Process Theory is that the two methods…

Logic and Similarity – New Dual Process Theory

Induction. A verbal description does not always suffice. A collection of gears with interlapping pulleys doesn't describe the overall result.

Two separate methods are used to describe the world—categories and patterns—the first verbal, the second not. Verbal leads to logic and patterns lead to similarity, different methods of reasoning which proceed simultaneously. Category A category is the basis of a word-oriented description of our world. It is produced and used of the language dominant side…

Left and Right Brain – Dual Process Brain

Left brain, language areas with connecting neural bundle. Motor cortex shown to orient view

People often say things like “I’m right brained. I’m creative” or “I’m left brained. I can figure out any logical problem.” Although that’s a fun path for casual conversation, the left-right distinction is overblown and inaccurate. However, let’s not let that neglect a residual issue. This post examines one  function, language, which has identifiable locations…

Complexity in Environment

Simple person facing many simple challenges

People exhibit a vast behavioral repertoire. How do we explain this wide range of choices? Normally we think of people as being very complicated and each of us different from everybody else. Complex Personality Our typical presumption is that each person has a complex personality which explains the variation in personal behavior. Sometimes, we get…

100 Step Rule

Three shafts in an elevator tower, like the multiple streams the brain must deal with

The 100 Step Rule in neuroscience asserts that approximately 100 neural steps take place from visual input to recognition. It is useful as it relates the parallel aspects of the brain to sequential thinking. For instance, a million optical nerves come into the cortex. They are handled all at once, in parallel. However, it takes…